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landomata

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Competitors
« on: May 20, 2014, 06:41:42 pm »

This is where we will post information about our competitor.  ;D

qbd1313

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2014, 07:26:12 am »

Secret and Whisper
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stone

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2014, 07:40:52 am »

Truth
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landomata

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2014, 09:52:12 am »

PQChat

stone

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2014, 09:26:40 am »

Wut
Confide
Yik Yak
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stone

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2014, 09:29:40 am »

Anonymous Apps Are So Scary, They May Just Help Us Discover Ourselves

You’re a person known only to yourself. The fears and loves and hates that most define you are often the things you cannot discuss openly. But sometimes we need to let others see our secret selves—without revealing our true identities. A wave of new applications aims to help us do just that.

It’s a renaissance, of sorts. We flirted with real names online, but our love of anonymity, one of the Internet’s best and most resilient features, is suddenly born again. All it needs to reach adulthood is a higher calling.

Apps like Secret, Wut, Confide, Whisper, and Yik Yak all share a common goal: to let us broadcast to the people around us without exposing that we’re the ones talking. They suck up your contacts or check your location, then pass your messages along to friends and nearby listeners, stripped of identifying information. The format is new, sure, but the experience itself is a throwback.

The services that made it possible for us to post online in the first place—IRC, Usenet, chat rooms—are all friends to the pseudonymous. Websites like craigslist and 4chan also embraced anonymity to great effect. Protest movements sprang from it. Commenters used it to attack and despoil.

Maybe it was because of the nasty comments or the realization that it’s hard to trust a stranger, but in recent years we’ve sought identity online. Facebook and Google both tried to shoehorn us into real names. And on mobile there’s never really been a widespread channel for speaking to a broad audience without tying your message to some identity.

Recently, though, something has become apparent: Contrary to our hopes, real names haven’t actually made online discussions more civil—or even more trustworthy.

And young as they are, anonymous apps have begun to earn our grudging trust. We learned on Secret that Nike was laying off much of its hardware team and that Google+ boss Vic Gundotra was looking for a new job—and we heard it well before the traditional media reports. The comfort of anonymity, it turns out, can foster truth. Still, these new services scare the bones out of people. CNN, the AP, and The New York Times have all written hand-wringing fright pieces. Über-investor Marc Andreessen wrote that they’re “designed to encourage negative behavior, tearing people down.”

Sure. People talk a lot of shit. But maybe that’s because the platforms they’re using aren’t about anything. Anonymity works when it serves a larger purpose. That’s why capital-A Anonymous is an effective protest organization and why you’ll buy something based on a craigslist post. We like to see a reason behind masked identity.

Whisper, Wut, Secret, and their peers are upending this structure. They’re anonymity in the service of anonymity. For a public weary of being tracked, this has been a mostly pleasant development. But that’s a short-term boon; if the apps want to continue to thrive, they’ll need more of a mission than just spreading tantalizing information.

Here’s a secret: If Internet history is a guide, one of these apps will become greater than itself. It will find a cause to serve—maybe something as simple as community. When that happens, these apps will cease to be scary. Instead of working for anonymity, they’ll be putting anonymity to work.
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landomata

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2014, 12:36:25 pm »

"Unlimited group chats"+ anonymity = micronews

what do you think of this concept?






stone

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2014, 07:52:54 am »

Competitor valuation analysis

1. SnapChat was established in May 2011, the valuation of approximately 3.6 billion  dollars.

2.Secret was festablished in November 2013, 8.6 million dollars of financing, valued at approximately 40 million dollars.

3.Whisper was established in 2012, a total of 60 million  dollars of financing;

4.Yik Yak was established in October 2013, finance 11.1 million dollars;

4. nxtty was established in 2014 , the valuation of approximately xxx billion dollars.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2014, 07:56:27 am by stone »
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Darkhorse

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2014, 08:07:06 am »

I thought there is one in the latest trend with the name of "Yo! " ?
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stone

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2014, 09:12:04 am »

I thought there is one in the latest trend with the name of "Yo! " ?

"yo" not belong Anonymous
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allwelder

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2014, 09:55:19 am »

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landomata

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2014, 07:03:26 pm »

stone

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2014, 12:54:09 am »

Secret Users Have Started Hosting Secret Dinner Parties, and They Are Brutal

Secret dinner party, said the intriguing post on Secret, an anonymous sharing app.

Invitations were application only, the host wrote in the comments. As instructed, I used an anonymous account to submit my best secret to a Google doc.

A few days later, I got an email with the details:

secret dinner invite

Five nights later, on an overcast Monday evening, I drove to downtown Oakland. The block was mostly low-lying buildings and empty lots, except for my destination, a large apartment complex. A printed note on the door read: “You know who you are. Welcome.”

The call-in buttons on the intercom weren’t working. I saw an alley across the street, and imagined that would probably be where I would be killed. I called the dinner host. He came down the elevator, introduced himself as Kai, and welcomed me inside, saying I was the first to arrive. He wore a crisply ironed gray linen vest, a tie and raw denim jeans, and he cradled a chihuahua named Nymeria in his arm like a football. I offered him my lemon bars, and he escorted me to his apartment, which was lightly cluttered with bikes and athletic footwear.

“We all end up in these silos of an expected life. I know who I am around the people I know, but anonymously? What can I be anonymously?” Kai said, talking as he finished preparations for dinner (beef stew, black rice, mint and strawberries for muddling with vodka). “I want a place where I can be raw again. Where I can be honest. Where it doesn’t always have to be vacation pictures and ‘Look how great I am.’ I find situations where I make my own luck. I bought a share of Microsoft, and told people I co-owned a business with Bill Gates. My daddy didn’t go to Yale. I find situations where I can punch above my weight.”

All of this before we had even had a drink.

We moved to the apartment building’s common area, a large, clean, modern loft that Kai had reserved for his Secret dinner. There were tables and couches and a spot on the wall with wires sticking out where a TV probably had been. Of the nine guests milling around, seven were women in their mid-twenties to late-thirties. I introduced myself as a reporter, and one woman asked if this was an official Secret marketing event (it was not). Several guests commented on the fact that it was funny that we all wanted to meet strangers but, then again, we probably weren’t that far from being friends.
secret dinner party

Nellie Bowles

“Listen, we wouldn’t have seen the Secret if we weren’t either friends, or friends of friends,” said Simona, who wore a blazer over her startup T-shirt, and called Secret her “bathroom habit.”

“Look me up on Facebook,” Simona said. And indeed, it turned out that we had eight mutual friends — I had even dated one of them for a summer.

A woman named Elizabeth, who works in tech PR, told the story of throwing the first-ever Secret dinner a month ago: She started by “collecting interesting people off different threads.”

Not everyone was enthusiastic about the idea at first. Elizabeth reached out to one woman who had posted that she had grown up in the ghetto, and was now making six figures. “I think [the invitation] freaked her out. She said, ‘Who the hell are you, this sounds scary,'” Elizabeth recalled. She also liked someone’s post about the inappropriate overuse of Purell (he showed up, along with half a dozen others). A tradition of sorts was born.

We pushed two round rolling tables together to make a communal table, topped with plates in a hodgepodge of patterns. And as the group at this second-ever Secret dinner started eating, they settled into a conversation with a unique rhythm.

Guests spoke in short bytes, and then responded to each other with affirmations. Topics changed quickly and organically. It was trusting, and it was jarring. It was as though the Secret app had exploded into a living room.

The conversation started on the notion of love.

“The most successful online dating I’ve ever done is when I posted to Craigslist and offered someone to be my plus-one to a Louis C.K. concert and gave them my OkCupid handle,” Kai began. “But I think they just wanted me for the ticket.”
secret dinner party

Nellie Bowles

“I end up falling in love with profiles, not people,” said a woman named Ina, who wore wire-rim glasses and a jacket that she kept wrapped tightly around her. “I’ve had relationships with OkCupid profiles.”

“I had an online profile that was too good,” said Laura, who wore a peacock-feather headband, a long, black ball gown, and had brought along a black poodle named Byron. “So all I was was a disappointment, over and over again.”

Kai fed his chihuahua tiny chunks of steak under the table.

One person spoke at a time. They weren’t shy. Someone started debating a doomed character from the science-fiction book “Flowers for Algernon.”

“Why did he do that?” Ina asked. “He estranged himself from the one he loved.”

“You’re saying love is irrational? That people in emotional relationships behave in suboptimal ways? Hold on, let me post that on Secret,” Kai said, sarcastically.

“What we consider irrational about love is really Stockholm Syndrome,” said a woman named Fern, who wore a red braid across her forehead.

“Do you have a low-entropy life?” Laura asked Ina. “I’m an engineer, so I can tell you’re one too.”

“Because I’m Asian and wearing glasses?” Ina asked, palpably offended.

Dinner was finished by around 9 pm, but there was plenty of wine left. The conversation turned to family.

“I know exactly how fast welts heal because of my family,” Kai said. “The ROI on family is just not there for me.”

Simona nodded. “This summer, my mom and I worked on our relationship like no other — we watched ‘Brave,’ we went to therapy, we smoked pot. We used to fight. Once she said, ‘None of this would have happened if you hadn’t gotten an eating disorder.’ I said, ‘I wouldn’t have gotten an eating disorder if you weren’t such a controlling bitch.'”

“Well, now that we’re sharing secrets,” Laura said, speaking the subtext of the entire evening. “I’ve never had a personal relationship with my father in my life. It’s been so conflict-free, I have to invoke conflict to start a relationship.”

“My brother steals from me, and he’s an effing M.D.,” Kai chimed in.

“The past and future could exist now,” Fern said, though I’d lost track of how the conversation got there.

Ina responded, apparently still miffed about being called an “engineer”: “Those papers [about past-future convergence] are written by a bunch of humanities majors who know nothing.”

“What do you want from your parents?” Fern asked Kai.

“All I want with my parents is peace. There’s a global maximum that can’t be reached, but there’s also a local maximum that can,” Kai said. “We have to optimize the code for peace.”

A few hours later, people stood up to leave. A few of them helped clear the table. They hugged. They exchanged real-world contact information. A woman named Lulu, who wore an oversized American Apparel T-shirt and had been pretty quiet all night, leaned against the wall for a minute and stared at the ceiling.

“It’s a little weighty for a Monday night,” Lulu said.
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landomata

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2014, 04:40:49 am »

 :o   speechless....

jefdiesel

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2014, 04:50:10 am »

Secret Users Have Started Hosting Secret Dinner Parties, and They Are Brutal

Secret dinner party, said the intriguing post on Secret, an anonymous sharing app.

Invitations were application only, the host wrote in the comments. As instructed, I used an anonymous account to submit my best secret to a Google doc.

A few days later, I got an email with the details:

secret dinner invite

Five nights later, on an overcast Monday evening, I drove to downtown Oakland. The block was mostly low-lying buildings and empty lots, except for my destination, a large apartment complex. A printed note on the door read: “You know who you are. Welcome.”

The call-in buttons on the intercom weren’t working. I saw an alley across the street, and imagined that would probably be where I would be killed. I called the dinner host. He came down the elevator, introduced himself as Kai, and welcomed me inside, saying I was the first to arrive. He wore a crisply ironed gray linen vest, a tie and raw denim jeans, and he cradled a chihuahua named Nymeria in his arm like a football. I offered him my lemon bars, and he escorted me to his apartment, which was lightly cluttered with bikes and athletic footwear.

“We all end up in these silos of an expected life. I know who I am around the people I know, but anonymously? What can I be anonymously?” Kai said, talking as he finished preparations for dinner (beef stew, black rice, mint and strawberries for muddling with vodka). “I want a place where I can be raw again. Where I can be honest. Where it doesn’t always have to be vacation pictures and ‘Look how great I am.’ I find situations where I make my own luck. I bought a share of Microsoft, and told people I co-owned a business with Bill Gates. My daddy didn’t go to Yale. I find situations where I can punch above my weight.”

All of this before we had even had a drink.

We moved to the apartment building’s common area, a large, clean, modern loft that Kai had reserved for his Secret dinner. There were tables and couches and a spot on the wall with wires sticking out where a TV probably had been. Of the nine guests milling around, seven were women in their mid-twenties to late-thirties. I introduced myself as a reporter, and one woman asked if this was an official Secret marketing event (it was not). Several guests commented on the fact that it was funny that we all wanted to meet strangers but, then again, we probably weren’t that far from being friends.
secret dinner party

Nellie Bowles

“Listen, we wouldn’t have seen the Secret if we weren’t either friends, or friends of friends,” said Simona, who wore a blazer over her startup T-shirt, and called Secret her “bathroom habit.”

“Look me up on Facebook,” Simona said. And indeed, it turned out that we had eight mutual friends — I had even dated one of them for a summer.

A woman named Elizabeth, who works in tech PR, told the story of throwing the first-ever Secret dinner a month ago: She started by “collecting interesting people off different threads.”

Not everyone was enthusiastic about the idea at first. Elizabeth reached out to one woman who had posted that she had grown up in the ghetto, and was now making six figures. “I think [the invitation] freaked her out. She said, ‘Who the hell are you, this sounds scary,'” Elizabeth recalled. She also liked someone’s post about the inappropriate overuse of Purell (he showed up, along with half a dozen others). A tradition of sorts was born.

We pushed two round rolling tables together to make a communal table, topped with plates in a hodgepodge of patterns. And as the group at this second-ever Secret dinner started eating, they settled into a conversation with a unique rhythm.

Guests spoke in short bytes, and then responded to each other with affirmations. Topics changed quickly and organically. It was trusting, and it was jarring. It was as though the Secret app had exploded into a living room.

The conversation started on the notion of love.

“The most successful online dating I’ve ever done is when I posted to Craigslist and offered someone to be my plus-one to a Louis C.K. concert and gave them my OkCupid handle,” Kai began. “But I think they just wanted me for the ticket.”
secret dinner party

Nellie Bowles

“I end up falling in love with profiles, not people,” said a woman named Ina, who wore wire-rim glasses and a jacket that she kept wrapped tightly around her. “I’ve had relationships with OkCupid profiles.”

“I had an online profile that was too good,” said Laura, who wore a peacock-feather headband, a long, black ball gown, and had brought along a black poodle named Byron. “So all I was was a disappointment, over and over again.”

Kai fed his chihuahua tiny chunks of steak under the table.

One person spoke at a time. They weren’t shy. Someone started debating a doomed character from the science-fiction book “Flowers for Algernon.”

“Why did he do that?” Ina asked. “He estranged himself from the one he loved.”

“You’re saying love is irrational? That people in emotional relationships behave in suboptimal ways? Hold on, let me post that on Secret,” Kai said, sarcastically.

“What we consider irrational about love is really Stockholm Syndrome,” said a woman named Fern, who wore a red braid across her forehead.

“Do you have a low-entropy life?” Laura asked Ina. “I’m an engineer, so I can tell you’re one too.”

“Because I’m Asian and wearing glasses?” Ina asked, palpably offended.

Dinner was finished by around 9 pm, but there was plenty of wine left. The conversation turned to family.

“I know exactly how fast welts heal because of my family,” Kai said. “The ROI on family is just not there for me.”

Simona nodded. “This summer, my mom and I worked on our relationship like no other — we watched ‘Brave,’ we went to therapy, we smoked pot. We used to fight. Once she said, ‘None of this would have happened if you hadn’t gotten an eating disorder.’ I said, ‘I wouldn’t have gotten an eating disorder if you weren’t such a controlling bitch.'”

“Well, now that we’re sharing secrets,” Laura said, speaking the subtext of the entire evening. “I’ve never had a personal relationship with my father in my life. It’s been so conflict-free, I have to invoke conflict to start a relationship.”

“My brother steals from me, and he’s an effing M.D.,” Kai chimed in.

“The past and future could exist now,” Fern said, though I’d lost track of how the conversation got there.

Ina responded, apparently still miffed about being called an “engineer”: “Those papers [about past-future convergence] are written by a bunch of humanities majors who know nothing.”

“What do you want from your parents?” Fern asked Kai.

“All I want with my parents is peace. There’s a global maximum that can’t be reached, but there’s also a local maximum that can,” Kai said. “We have to optimize the code for peace.”

A few hours later, people stood up to leave. A few of them helped clear the table. They hugged. They exchanged real-world contact information. A woman named Lulu, who wore an oversized American Apparel T-shirt and had been pretty quiet all night, leaned against the wall for a minute and stared at the ceiling.

“It’s a little weighty for a Monday night,” Lulu said.

whered you get this from?
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kodtycoon

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2014, 07:08:09 pm »

:o   speechless....

Why speechless? A gang of strangers had dinner after meeting on secret i assume?? Just sounded like a more civilized come dine with me lol
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igmaca

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2014, 06:28:44 pm »

Is anyone looking at and considering GEMS? It is a similar project to Nxtty however, they Gems will be a counterparty asset. They just released a white paper:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/10ZIvAbI-91qyJTbAaxCH3etbgMy9AyOsf403rhPu4pA/edit#
Very intresting!
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landomata

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2014, 10:04:39 pm »

Is anyone looking at and considering GEMS? It is a similar project to Nxtty however, they Gems will be a counterparty asset. They just released a white paper:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/10ZIvAbI-91qyJTbAaxCH3etbgMy9AyOsf403rhPu4pA/edit#
Very intresting!

Thanks....we are aware of them.

cobaltskky

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2014, 11:02:04 am »

Kill them with fire.
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landomata

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Re: Competitors
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2014, 12:28:22 pm »

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